Tatkon Center boasts Agave blooms

plant

Margherita Fabrizio, director of the Carol Tatkon Center, is known for her large garden and many “tender” plants in large pots that are moved in and out of her house each year. But because the flower stem of her approximately 15-year-old Agave Americana (commonly known as Century Plant), grew higher than her ceilings allowed, Fabrizio brought her plant to the center. The flower stem is now about 90 inches high and the plant is starting to bloom.

Native to Mexico and the southwestern United States, Agaves bloom in nature when they reach 10-25 years old. Some have even been known not to bloom until their 80th year. The tall stalk of spectacular flowers signals the end of the plant’s life cycle. The plant blooms only once and then dies.

However, the species also produces numerous small “pups,” or baby plants. These new offshoots of the original plant will be cultivated for future plantings.

Agave blooms. Click on image for full view.
Agave blooms. Click on image for full view.
Agave blooms. Click on image for full view.
Agave blooms. Click on image for full view.